Memories for Winter

The dying give voice, Spring brings forth new blooms
In the day to day of life, Thriving on summer’s promise
When we lose our joy, Sometimes the boughs break
The soul is where we die first, So frail in the autumn’s wind
Long before our cold body, Leaves memories for winter


National Poetry Month for 2021 Day 22 gives me a Super Tanka

The Tanka is the name of an ancient form of Japanese poetry. Tanka are 31-syllable poems that have been the most popular form of poetry in Japan for at least 1300 years. In Japan, the Tanka is usually written as a straight line of characters, but in English and other Western languages, it is usually divided into five lines, with a syllable count of 5-7-5-7-7.

The key to the Super Tanka form is that it is two Tanka side-by-side. Each can be read independently, but must work together as a whole, in the end creating three works. The more different in idea of one Tanka from the other, the better.

GPS

Squiggles on a screen/in the dark night

time the path of my travel/there lays a stillness between

lines that do not take/the distance of us

into account the beating/that is guiding the silence

of my warm heart already there/at home so close yet so far

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Having another go at a (Super) Tanka

Colleen’s 2020 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday
#Poetry Challenge No. 192, #Themeprompt : Map

Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge

No Means To Measure

I rise up in slate – what care I of time?

Shades reflective of my soul – my heart wonders in hues felt,

Charcoal through silver – yellows through purples.

Dawn or dusk does not matter – the seconds, minutes, the hours

In the colors of mourning – are no means to measure joy.

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At dVerse, Frank Tassone, our pubtender for today’s Meeting the Bar, challenges us to delve into aesthetics of Imagism, where less verbiage is employed to produce more imagery. We’re also encouraged to use Japanese or Sappho Greek lyric to accomplish such.

I chose an ancient form of Japanese poetry called Tanka and used it as a Super Tanka.

Tanka are 31-syllable poems. In Japan, it is usually written as a straight line of characters, but in English and other Western languages, it is usually divided into five lines, with a syllable count of 5-7-5-7-7.

The key to the Super Tanka form is that it is two Tanka side-by-side. Each can be read independently, yet must also work together as a whole, in effect creating three poems in one.

dVerse Poets Pub Meeting the Bar: Imagism Revisited

dVerse Poets Pub - OpenLinkNight Mic

A Flush of Release

Given sweet release, on a sultry night
One hears the morning bird’s song, I close my eyes and breathe deep
It bans the darkness, heeding ganja’s call
Sleep a hazy memory, in the aromatic flush
Bright music waking the soul, all coherent thinking lost

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Tonight on dVerse Poets Pub Mish challenges us to flush things out in a quadrille – a poem of exactly 44 words not including the title. One of those 44 words must be the prompt – flush..

As I worked this out I realized I was on the path to creating a Super Tanka, so I just went with Muse and combined both. And being that today is 4/20 my mind naturally went to ganja’s call…

Let Me

There should be no sound, so you can hear me
Yet I hear your voice scream out, in the silence of your love
Its timbre pains me, its timbre thrills you
When your yesterdays haunt you, in the restlessness of night
Would you accept me as balm? Let me be tomorrow’s peace

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TANKA / SUPER TANKA

The Tanka is an ancient form of Japanese poetry. Tanka are 31-syllable poems that have been the most popular form of poetry in Japan for at least 1300 years. In Japan, the Tanka is usually written as a straight line of characters, but in English and other Western languages, it is usually divided into five lines, with a syllable count of 5-7-5-7-7.

The key to the Super Tanka form is that it is two Tanka written side-by-side. Each can be read independently, but must work together as a whole.

dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse  ~ Poet Pub |
OpenLinkNight #220