First Night

Less our doubts will be,
Stowed away with trouble.
Some sweet peace to sleep with.

In this our first night to be,
Holding love for life.

Time under this moon;
Light on our twining bodies, so good.
Will this first night never to end!


dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Compound me a Sleepy Quadrille night!

dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse ~ Poets Pub

I pull a double dVerse duty swinging two prompts in one write:

dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Quadrille night! Sleepy times.

First Sarah (sarahsouthwest) invited us to write a sleepy little quadrille. A quadrille, is simply a poem of 44 words, excluding the title. It can be in any form, rhymed or unrhymed, metered, or unmetered. You MUST use the word “sleep” or some form of the word in your poem.

dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Poetics: Compound me!

Next Lillian insists we regale her a poem using at least one compound word from a list provided.

The catch being to split the word over.
Achieving its two components; yet keep it together. (<– see what I did there)

Naturally, does Muse just use one compound word in a poem? Noooooo…. Let’s make every confounded end/start line be compounded – yeah! Oh!, and still make a quadrille – right!

Hades to Persephone

Flanked by the seasons
twixt chill through warmth
Then back ‘round
Who could
know?

That you’d fall for me
Or that I’d fall
So deeply
in with
you?

This in no surprise
We’re touched as gods
All that’s left
Is to
ask…

Marry
Me?


dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse ~ Poets Pub

dVerse ~ Poets Pub | ‘Tis the Season Quadrille #149

Tonight at the pub, Lisa tends bar and sets the season on a quadrille.

A quadrille, is simply a poem of 44 words, excluding the title. It can be in any form, rhymed or unrhymed, metered, or unmetered. You MUST use the word “season” or some form of the word in your poem.

I also cheat a little in that my quadrille is also what I’ll call an Reverse Extended Arun. A nonce poem created by blogger GirlGriot. An Arun is a fifteen-line poem in three sets of five lines. Each set of five lines follows the same syllable structure: starting with one syllable and increasing by one syllable with each line. 1/2/3/4/5 — 3x. There are no other rhyme or structural requirements. I inverted the syllable count and add two words to fit the quadrille requirement into a proposal of mythical proportions.

Red, White, Blue

Much
Too deep
Much too fast
You blazed red in
Betrayal’s fury

From
Tears that
blurred the sight
With lust’s white heat
You let yourself fall

So
Cold in
Broken-hearted
Blues of too much
And not enough

<>==========<>==========<>

As is now tradition for me, I open National Poetry Writing Month with the Arun.

A nonce poem created by friend and fellow blogger, GirlGriot, an Arun is a fifteen-line poem in three sets of five lines. Each set of five lines follows the same syllable structure: starting with one syllable and increasing by one syllable with each line. 1/2/3/4/5 — 3x. There are no other rhyme or structural requirements. Today, I follow the pattern she’s set, left aligned and un-rhymed.  As always, I will take a little poetic license, in future runs of the form.

National Poetry Month 2022 graphic

The Anatomy of a Challenge

Over a dVerse ~Poets Pub, Sarah, the host for the challenge, prompts to choose one of the below paint names and use it as the inspiration for a poem:

Trumpet, Tea with Florence, Chemise, Confetti, Goblin,
Mirror, Rolling fog, First light, Hidey hole, Masquerade

We are further challenged to incorporate as many of the words as we can and to have fun. While I can post to my blog at any time, the challenge is only open for two days.

As I responded: Oh, that was said to the wrong person. It is my natural wont when see a list of options with a prompt to select one to try to use them all. 

In other words – thanks for giving me free rein to do what I was likely to do anyway. 😁 And because I am a glutton for punishment, I’m thinking a free verse poem would be easier for this but noooooooo, Muse is all Oooh, look! Sarah posted an extract from Christina Rosetti’s “Goblin Market”, let’s do a glosa! I’m thinking, okay, a tradition glosa works for this, gives me up to forty lines to work all that in. Crap! What did I think that for? Forty lines? Pfft! That’s too many – you can do this in just twenty, c’mon, Rai!

I swear, I can’t with them sometimes – except clearly I can, so I don’t even bother arguing – a shortened glosa it is – I pick two lines to work with:

They sounded kind and full of loves
In the pleasant weather
Goblin Market – Christina Rosetti

My next challenge: hidey-hole – what am I supposed to do with that? Hmm, grey shades of rolling fog at first light came to mind. For some reason I am minded of latter stages of butterfly chrysalis which are more beige than gray, but it stuck. Ah! chrysalis = hidey hole, butterfly – monarch. A visual of a monarch butterfly flittering among purple heather appears and three lines quickly emerge:

Among the violet hued heather
As she emerge from her hidey-hole
In ochre gown mirrored in trim of coal

Excellent, two items from the list are scratched off and I have part of the required rhyme for the endling line. Oh, apparently this butterfly is a female – okay.

Next thing to tackle: Goblin. How do I work that bad boy in? Ah, bad boy! Goblin’s has scared the butterfly, threatened her if she comes out. That helminth! Hmm, worm… And my opening lines appear:

Swaddled in the rolling fog
his ragged chemise color of bog
The goblin worm had filled her with fright
Dare she show upon first light

Scratch four more from the list! I go back and forth like this, until I I’m satisfied. I have met the requirements for a glosa and worked in nine of the ten phrases. What’s the hold out? Tea with Florence. Now ‘tea in Florence’ would have inspired an Italian slant, but it’s with Florence, something different. While I had thought of a couple of lines rhyming Florence, it would break the glosa form and I did not want to do that. I go back and read the requirements for the challenge and am reminded that the choices given can also be used for the title. And problem solved, the monarch has a name, and the poem has a title! Let’s meet:

Tea with Florence the Monarch

It’s not highbrow, not winning any awards. I’m just having fun telling a story in verse. It’s not bad for an hour and change worth of work.


Day 22 of 31 – Let’s see how others are slicing it out today…

15th Annual Slice of Life Writing Challenge

15th Annual Slice of Life Writing Challenge
Two Writing Teachers

Tea with Florence the Monarch

They sounded kind and full of loves
In the pleasant weather
Goblin Market – Christina Rosetti

Why swaddled in the rolling fog
his ragged chemise color of bog
The goblin worm had filled me with fright
Dare I show upon first light,
Somehow, I knew it wasn’t right
So ear against the wall I shove
To hear the trumpet of new voices
In offer of different choices
Not the nightmares feared of
They sounded kind and full of loves

Thus, I the ignored the fiend’s masquerade
Not a moment more to be waylaid
I am a monarch, I was ready
And chrysalis pieces flow and eddy
On the breeze like confetti
Among the violet hued heather
As I emerge from my hidey-hole
In ochre gown mirrored in trim of coal
With only the sky as tether
In the pleasant weather

Not the monarch you had in mind, I know


dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Poetics – Colour me poetry

dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse ~ Poets Pub


Tonight at the pub, Sarah tends bar for this session of Poetics.

Inspired by the intriguing names of paint samples, we are prompted to choose one of the below paint names and use it as the inspiration for a poem:

Trumpet, Tea with Florence, Chemise, Confetti, Goblin, Mirror, Rolling fog, First light, Hidey hole, Masquerade

We are further challenged to incorporate as many of the words as we can and to have fun.

Oh, that was said to the wrong person. It is my natural wont when see a list of options with a prompt to select one to try to use them all. And because I am that gal, I do so in one of my favorite poetry forms, a glosa. Using two lines of Goblin Market by Christina Rosetti to tell this 1st person tale of a butterfly’s beginnings.

Taking Flight

He runs fingers along angles

Acute, obtuse, isosceles

All equilateral, never scalene

And he smiles, taken to a fold in time

When such maths were only

Figures on a paper

Now precursor

To his child’s delight

In angled velum sheets

Folded to take flight

Hand launching paper airplane


dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse ~ Poets Pub

dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Quadrille #148 – Papered Poems

Tonight at the pub, De Jackson, aka WhimsyGizmo tends bar and challenges us to fill our papers, pixelated or otherwise, with a quadrille.

A quadrille, is simply a poem of 44 words, excluding the title. It can be in any form, rhymed or unrhymed, metered, or unmetered. You MUST use the word “paper” or some form of the word in your poem.

Beyond Description

Beyond description is game I like to play

Shifting with mood or light to sway

Never really blue, never really grey

With sparkles of laughter or tears to cry

In hues to cause this soul sweet sighs

Until the day Lachesis closed your eyes


dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse ~ Poets Pub

dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Eyeing the Quadrille #147

Tonight at the pub, Björn tends bar and sets the eye on a quadrille.

A quadrille, is simply a poem of 44 words, excluding the title. It can be in any form, rhymed or unrhymed, metered, or unmetered. You MUST use the word “eye” or some form of the word in your poem.

Not Just One

Before me
Its emptiness
Is indeed a shock
Remnants of its past fullness
Cling in memory to mock

The fault Lays with me
I cannot quibble
Once full bag of crisps now done
Thought I’d have a nibble
Lost the bet on that one

“Lays Chips: betcha can’t eat just one

dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Quadrille #145: Nibble

dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse ~ Poets Pub

Tonight at the pub, Mish tends bar and gives us a a little something to nibble in a quadrille prompt.

I plead the fifth on whether the above poem is based on real or recent events.

A quadrille, is simply a poem of 44 words, excluding the title. It can be in any form, rhymed or unrhymed, metered, or unmetered. You MUST use the word “nibble” or some form of the word in your poem.

From Dawn to Dusk

We float, we wake, we breathe, we scream
Search for the dream
And all we find
Opens the mind

Yet all the choices that we make
In no time take
As El Sol sighs
‘Til we close eyes

When the heart beats for last time
Its mortal chime
That now is done
With Earth we’re one


dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse ~ Poets Pub

dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Poetry Form: The Minute Poem

Today at dVerse Poets Pub, Grace tends the bar challenges us to take a sixty seconds, or so, to form a Minute Poem.

The Minute Poem, created by Verna Lee Hinegardner, once poet laureate of Arkansas, is a 60 syllable verse form, one syllable for each second in a minute.

It has the following rules…

1. narrative poetry.
2. a 12 line poem made up of 3 quatrains. (3 of 4-line stanzas)
3. syllabic, 8-4-4-4   8-4-4-4   8-4-4-4 (First line has 8 syllables of each stanza.  Remaining lines has 4 syllables in each stanza)
4. rhymed, rhyme scheme of aabb ccdd eeff.
5. description of a finished event (preferably something done is 60 seconds).
6. is best suited to light verse, likely humorous, whimsical or semi-serious.

Yeah, about numbers 5 and 6 – I heard Melpomene scoff “What’s a minute to the sun?” in my mind and knew Muse, being contrary, was going to kick “humorous, whimsical or semi-serious” to the curb. I just write the report.

Your Voice

In sound’s more gentle graces

Many failed with noises stifled, stark

But you’re a jaguar in a cello

Your voice sultry, dangerous, dark

And oh, how it paces

My heart to quaken, quivering

For it’s only you, sweet fellow

Who leaves me shaken, shivering


dVerse ~ Poets Pub | Quadrille #144: Shivering!

dVerse Poets Pub graphic
dVerse ~ Poets Pub

Tonight at the pub, Merrill tends bar and gives us a shivering invite for a quadrille.

A quadrille, is simply a poem of 44 words, excluding the title. It can be in any form, rhymed or unrhymed, metered, or unmetered. You MUST use the word “shiver” or some form of the word in your poem.